I Have a Sin Problem

Monday, Jan. 12

Thanks to Dave Boldt I got a new slant on I John 1:9. This verse has always been a key statement as to how a Christian should deal with sin. I’ve struggled with it because it tells us that we need to confess our sins in order to be forgiven. But all sins—past, present, and future—are paid for by Christ on the cross. We are declared righteous. Rom. 5-6. I don’t have a problem with the need to confess daily sins. That seems reasonable. But the fact is I sin continuously all day every day. I say that because we are to love God with all our heart, soul, mind, soul, and strength (Mk. 12:30). I fall miserably short on that. And I’m to love my neighbor as myself—and again, I fail miserably. If I were to confess all my sins, I would do it 24/7 and it would still not be enough time. And all the time I would be confessing sin, I would continue to sin—by the same impossible standard. So what is the answer? The issue concerns sins that have been brought to our attention, sins that have broken fellowship with God and/or others. Ps. 66:18 supports this. “If I regard iniquity in my heart, the Lord will not hear me.” Example: If I speak sharply to my wife, she recognizes it and I recognize it. I need to confess this to God and to my wife. This is what 1 Jn. 1:9 is dealing with. Confession brings forgiveness and fellowship is restored. But that’s not the end of the verse. It goes on to say that God will then cleanse us from all unrighteousness. The multitude of sins that Mt. 12:30 speaks of are also forgiven. The sins that break fellowship, that raise barriers, these are the ones that need to be dealt with individually and specifically. We must not take it lightly. And God has told us how to deal with it in 1 John 1:9.

Dave Boldt I got a new slant on I John 1:9. This verse has always been a key statement as to how a Christian should deal with sin. I’ve struggled with it because it tells us that we need to confess our sins in order to be forgiven. But all sins—past, present, and future—are paid for by Christ on the cross. We are declared righteous. Rom. 5-6. I don’t have a problem with the need to confess daily sins. That seems reasonable. But the fact is I sin continuously all day every day. I say that because we are to love God with all our heart, soul, mind, soul, and strength (Mk. 12:30). I fall miserably short on that. And I’m to love my neighbor as myself—and again, I fail miserably. If I were to confess all my sins, I would do it 24/7 and it would still not be enough time. And all the time I would be confessing sin, I would continue to sin—by the same impossible standard. So what is the answer? The issue concerns sins that have been brought to our attention, sins that have broken fellowship with God and/or others. Ps. 66:18 supports this. “If I regard iniquity in my heart, the Lord will not hear me.” Example: If I speak sharply to my wife, she recognizes it and I recognize it. I need to confess this to God and to my wife. This is what 1 Jn. 1:9 is dealing with. Confession brings forgiveness and fellowship is restored. But that’s not the end of the verse. It goes on to say that God will then cleanse us from all unrighteousness. The multitude of sins that Mt. 12:30 speaks of are also forgiven. The sins that break fellowship, that raise barriers, these are the ones that need to be dealt with individually and specifically. We must not take it lightly. And God has told us how to deal with it in 1 John 1:9.

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