A Fish Story

Sunday, Feb. 12                                

John 20:30-31 sounds like an ending statement.  “Jesus did many other miraculous signs in the presence of his disciples, which are not recorded in this book.  But these are written that you may believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God, and that by believing you may have life in his name.”  And then there is chapter 21.  I guess you could call chapter 21 an epilogue or an addendum.  Throughout John’s gospel, Jesus focused on believing, which applied to the disciples as well at to the Jewish crowds.  So maybe chapter 21 focuses more on their future ministry than believing—which would explain John 20:30-31.  In any case, chapter 21 is a remarkable chapter.  It starts with the fishing account.  Peter decided to go fishing and six other disciples chose to go with him.  That alone is remarkable under the circumstances.  Why weren’t they with Jesus or at least looking for him?  They fished all night without catching anything.  Then Jesus called to them from the shore and gave instructions.  The result was a full net of large fish.  That was enough for John, who was a fisherman, to know that it was Jesus on the shore.  Several miraculous things happened.  The 153 fish, the fact that Jesus knew what would happen, all the fish were large ones, and the net didn’t break as it should have with that load of fish.  You might want to ponder where Jesus got the fish that he already had cooking and the bread, which was evidently sufficient to feed all those hungry men.  A person could make any number of applications—that Jesus had called them to be fishers of men, that of the fish that were caught, none of them were lost, that only big fish were caught,  that the fishing was a joint effort, that the disciples shared their fish with Jesus at his request . . . . . But that’s not the end of the story.   I’ll get to it tomorrow.

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